LIVE WORKING

COURSE 425: 1 DAY: Max 8 Candidates

There are many situations where live working can be reasonably justified. However, by the very definition of live working danger will always exist. It is therefore essential that anyone working on or near exposed live conductors possesses the knowledge and experience necessary to avoid injury. This course explores the justification for live work, the correct procedures to be adopted and the necessary protective equipment.

PARTICIPANTS

This course is intended for competent electricians.

COURSE PRESENTATION

The course is presented in three stages; the legal issues, the dangers of live work and the methods of mitigating these dangers. Practical sessions follow where the candidates perform live work on a series of equipment that simulate real industrial scenarios. Comprehensive course notes are provided.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

On completion of the course, participants will be able to:

Successful completion of the course leads to the award of the Technical Training Solutions competence Certificate 425: Live Working.

What do candidates on the Live Working course actually do?

The Live Working course begins with an overview of the key points of the Electricity at Work Regulations, with particular emphasis on Regulation 14, which defines what constitutes live working and sets out the criteria necessary to justify it.

Page 9 of the course notes for the Live Working course, exploring the key aspects the candidates need to understand in the EAW regulations Page 10 of the course notes for the Live Working course, where we analyse in detail the regulation which defines live working Page 11 of the course notes for the Live Working course, where we discuss the meaning of competence, supervision and accompaniment

Page 9 of the course notes for the Live Working course, exploring the key aspects the candidates need to understand in the EAW regulations

Page 10 of the course notes for the Live Working course, where we analyse in detail the regulation which defines live working

Page 11 of the course notes for the Live Working course, where we discuss the meaning of competence, supervision and accompaniment

A structured slide-show is used by our instructors to help convey the meaning of each of the EAW Regulations. Candidates can read the exact wording of the Regulations provided in the course notes and then discuss what this means in reality.

One of the practical exercises on the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course: Calculating fuse operating times from fault current values One of the practical exercises on the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course: Calculating circuit-breaker operating times from fault current values

One of the Slides used for the Live working course, explaining the requirements made by the EAW Regulations with regard to working live

One of the Slides used for the Live working course, explaining what is necessary for the justification for working live

We then look at the dangers associated with live working starting with the effects of electric shock current on the body. We examine the dangers of fire and explosion caused by overload, short circuit and earth fault. Next we explore the different protection methods used to prevent direct and indirect contact shock. The candidates then examine how various standards define hazardous and non-hazardous voltages and how the environment in which the testing is taking place can affect the level of danger. The next subject to be discussed is Permit to Work; when to use them and how they can help to prevent accidents.

Page 13 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the effects of electric shock Page 14 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the effects of electric shock Page 16 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the dangers of a short circuit

Page 13 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the effects of electric shock

Page 14 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the effects of electric shock

Page 16 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining the dangers of a short circuit

This is page 7 of the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course notes: explaining the terminology and definitions used in the regulations This is page 14 of the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course notes: looking at the standard circuit arrangements and how to determine which items require earthing etc This is page 20 of the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course notes: here we look at the design procedure used to determine the sizes of wires used in electrical installations

Page 17 of the course notes for the Live Working course, describing the various methods of protection against indirect contact shock

Page 18 of the course notes for the Live Working course, explaining how bonding reduces the danger of indirect contact shock

Page 20 of the course notes for the Live Working course, describing the various methods of protection against direct contact shock

The candidates then proceed to apply their knowledge in a demonstrable manner by completing a number of live working exercises. These exercises are carried out on industrial three phase motor control systems.

The following is three of the units that are used to check that the candidates are able to select the correct test instruments, leads and probes necessary to safely measure voltage, current and frequency in proximity to exposed conductors at hazardous voltages:

One of the practical exercises on the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course: looking at the design procedure for electrical installations, taking into account all the limiting factors of volt drop, earth fault loop impedance etc


This is one of the units used to check that the candidates are able to measure three-phase voltages safely.












One of the practical exercises on the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course: looking at the design procedure for electrical installations, taking into account all the limiting factors of volt drop, earth fault loop impedance etc


This is one of the units used to check that the candidates are able to measure current safely.












One of the practical exercises on the 17th edition IET Wiring regulations training course: looking at the design procedure for electrical installations, taking into account all the limiting factors of volt drop, earth fault loop impedance etc


This is one of the units used to check that the candidates are able to measure frequency safely.












This is one of the scopes we use on the live working course.



We use various test equipment on the live working course. Scopes and multimeters are our main interest. We also look carefully at the requirements for the test leads.

This is one of the scopes we use on the live working course.


















The tasks, equipment and suggested environments are different for each exercise, requiring the candidates to think carefully about their risk assessment and procedure. Only when the instructor is satisfied that both practical and theory aspects have been met will the candidate be signed off as having successfully completed the course. This in turn will lead to the issuing of the Technical Training Solutions Live Working Certificate.

If you would like to learn more about the Live Working course then please call us.

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