EAW REGULATIONS

COURSE 380: 1 DAY: Max 8 Candidates

What makes a person legally competent to do electrical work? In what way is the requirement for competency in electrical work more stringent than for other types of work? Who is responsible for ensuring that electrical tasks at work are carried out correctly? When is it legally permissible to work live? These are just some of the questions dealt with on this informative course – essential for all electrical engineers, electricians, supervisors – indeed anyone who works with electricity.

PARTICIPANTS

This course is essential for anyone involved in any form of electrical work including those who are responsible for supervising the electrical work activities of others.

COURSE PRESENTATION

This important subject is illustrated throughout by reference to real-life situations and practical applications. Comprehensive course notes are provided.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

On completion of the course, participants will have a thorough understanding of the current legal requirements regarding

Successful completion of the course leads to the award of the Technical Training Solutions underpinning knowledge certificate 380: Electricity at Work Regulations.

What do candidates on the EAW Regulations course actually do?

The EAW Regs course is often 'tuned' to suit the audience and our instructors like to get feedback from the candidates as the course progresses but the following gives a general breakdown of the main parts of the course.

Candidates on the Electricity at Work Regulations training course analyse the various links between the EAW Regs, the HSW Act, the wiring regulations etc. This drawing is taken from the course notes.

The Legal Implications: We begin by analysing the legal situation regarding the Electricity at Work Regulations. Candidates learn about the relationships between the relevant legal Acts, codes of practice and regulations (the Health & Safety at Work Act, the IEE Wiring Regulations etc).

Candidates are engaged in this part of the course by exploring the various scenarios that might arise - for example: Would non-compliance with the EAW Regs be a criminal or a civil offence? In what situations would compliance with the EAW regulations be necessary? Would a defence be needed to prove compliance with the EAW Regulations?

This analysis of the legal situation helps the candidates to clearly see the scope of the regulations - who, where and what they apply to. A syndicate exercise is staged here to help to reinforce these issues.

We then look at the broad subject area of the regulations so that the candidates can start to understand what the regulations cover and (in general) what the Regulations are trying to achieve. The definitions are then clearly explained - this is important as the meaning of 'live' or 'charged', for example, can have far-reaching implications when considered in the context of the specific requirements of the individual EAW regulations when they are studied later on in the course.

This is page 10 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, describing who and what is affected by the Regulations This is page 11 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, where we introduce syndicate exercises to engage the candidates in thinking about what the Regulations would have to say about various scenarios This is page 12 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, listing the broad subject areas of the Regulations and highlighting which regulations are absolute requirements

Page 10 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, describing who and what is affected by the Regulations

Page 11 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, where we introduce syndicate exercises to engage the candidates in thinking about what the Regulations would have to say about various scenarios

Page 12 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, listing the broad subject areas of the Regulations and highlighting which regulations are absolute requirements

A structured slide-show is used by our instructors to help convey the meaning of each of the EAW Regulations. Candidates can read the exact wording of the Regulations provided in the course notes and then discuss what this means in reality.

This is one of the Slides used for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the requirements made by the EAW Regulations with regard to electrical connections This is one of the Slides used for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining what the EAW Regulations mean by working live

One of the Slides used for the EAW Regulations course, explaining the requirements made by the EAW Regulations with regard to electrical connections

One of the Slides used for the EAW Regulations course, explaining what the EAW Regulations mean by working live

We then look at the issues surrounding the term 'duty holder' referred to in the EAW Regulations. This is an important concept as the candidates need to be made aware who might be held legally responsible. It is also important that candidates gain a proper understanding of the effects of electric shock, and this subject is taught next, with research information and graphs shown of the known effects of electric shock in the candidates' course notes.

This is page 13 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, describing the term 'duty holder' used in  the Regulations This is page 14 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the effects of electric shock This is page 15 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the effects of electric shock

Page 13 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, describing the term 'duty holder' used in the Regulations

Page 14 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, explaining the effects of electric shock

Page 15 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, explaining the effects of electric shock

We also show the candidates a short video which helps to explain the regulations in a slightly different context. The following are screen shots from this video, depicting the issues of live working.

This is part of the video used for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, depicting some of the issues surrounding live working This is part of the video used for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, depicting some of the issues surrounding live working

Part of the video used for the EAW Regulations course, depicting some of the issues surrounding live working

Part of the video used for the EAW Regulations course, depicting some of the issues surrounding live working

We then look at the important issues surrounding the term 'competence' referred to in the EAW Regulations. We look at how this relates to the candidates' work activities and the issues of supervision etc. The next regulations we study are regarding the issues of insulation, earthing and isolation. The following are extracts from the candidates' course notes.

This is page 24 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, describing the various ways that the Regulations require prevention from electric shock to be achieved This is page 27 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the methods by which earthing is used to reduce or eliminate the effects of electric shock This is page 35 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the methods by which electrical isolations may be achieved

Page 24 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, describing the various ways that the Regulations require prevention from electric shock to be achieved

Page 27 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, explaining the methods by which earthing is used to reduce or eliminate the effects of electric shock

Page 35 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, explaining the methods by which electrical isolations may be achieved

The course finishes by summarising each of the regulations that have been taught and reminding the candidates what they should have learned from them. The course notes provide a useful short summary of all the EAW Regulations. In order to ensure that the candidates have understood each of the key objectives of the course properly, we issue a multiple-choice assessment paper which they have to answer and return to our instructor. The instructor then fully debriefs each and every question, ensuring that every single candidate has understood all of the important points of the day.

This is page 43 of the course notes for the Electricity at Work Regulations course, providing a summary of the requirements of each of the EAW Regulations This is the front page of the course assessment of the Electricity at Work Regulations course, explaining the marking system and the instructions to the candidates This is page 2 of the multiple-choice assessment paper used on the Electricity at Work Regulations course: There are 15 questions in all

Page 43 of the course notes for the EAW Regulations course, providing a summary of the requirements of each of the EAW Regulations

Front page of the course assessment of the EAW Regulations course, explaining the marking system and the instructions to the candidates

Page 2 of the multiple-choice assessment paper used on the EAW Regulations course: There are 15 questions in all



If you would like to learn more about the EAW Regulations course then please call us.

 

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